Hotels Near Avebury

The World Heritage Site of Avebury attracts visitors from around the world, all eager to see the enormous neolithic henge monument.

Our boutique country hotels nearby are an ideal place to stay when exploring Avebury and the other attractions in Wiltshire, with comfortable, spacious rooms, on-site restaurants serving meals made with local ingredients and an impressive range of award-winning Butcombe beers and real ales.

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    Places To Stay Near Avebury

    After a busy day exploring everything Avebury has to offer, our nearby boutique hotels are the perfect place to stay the night with cosy beds, stylish decor and tasty breakfasts. Whilst you’re there, treat yourself to a delicious, locally-sourced pub meal and a tasty pint of Butcombe beer or ale.

    The Crown

    Just a stone’s throw from Dyrham Park and within easy reach of Bath, The Crown inn has 9 welcoming ensuite rooms, perfect for a sound night’s sleep after exploring the ancient monument of Avebury. On the menu at the on-site restaurant, you’ll find a cracking selection of hearty pub classics, perfectly paired with a variety of Butcombe beers behind the bar.

    The Horse & Groom

    The Horse & Groom is a grade II-listed inn nestled in the pretty village of Charlton. Featuring five charming, boutique bedrooms, a delicious menu of seasonal dishes and an impressive selection of award-winning Butcombe beers, the Horse & Groom has everything you need for a relaxing stay when visiting Avebury.

    The King’s Arms

    The King’s Arms hotel is a charming 18th-century inn set in the heart of Melksham. Featuring 13 modern, comfy bedrooms, a pub-restaurant offering exciting takes on pub classics and an array of award-winning Butcombe beers behind the bar, The King’s Arms is the perfect option for a boutique getaway when visiting Avebury.

    The Methuen Arms

    Steeped in history and character, The Methuen Arms hotel started life as a nunnery before being converted into a brewery and coaching inn in 1608. The inn offers 19 newly-renovated bedrooms, a mouth-watering food menu created with ingredients sourced from its kitchen garden, and a cosy bar area and spacious beer garden perfect for enjoying the inn’s range of hand-pulled ales. A short drive from Avebury, it is the perfect place to stay when visiting the area.

    The Northey Arms

    Located in beautiful Box on the outskirts of Bath, The Northey Arms is a stunning pub and inn steeped in history, with a warm and welcoming atmosphere. With 13 ensuite bedrooms, The Northey is the ideal location for a rural retreat, family break or staycation, while exploring Bath and the ancient site of Avebury. We’re passionate about great food and drink, with an all-day food offer focused on seasonal, locally sourced produce and hearty pub classics. Behind the bar you’ll find plenty of award-winning Butcombe beer and cider, and a wide range of wine and cocktails.

    The Quarrymans Arms

    Located in picturesque Box Hill, The Quarrymans Arms hotel is a gorgeous country inn boasting sweeping views of the Box Valley. The inn offers the perfect boutique getaway with four flawlessly-decorated bedrooms, a delightful restaurant serving the finest, locally-sourced seasonal produce, and a fantastic selection of ales, craft beers, local ciders and fine wines to get stuck into. We are located just a short drive from Avebury, making The Quarrymans the ideal base for visitors to the ancient monument.

    The White Hart

    Situated in the heart of picturesque Wroughton, The White Hart hotel is a beautiful thatched pub and inn. With 10 beautifully-decorated bedrooms, extensive food menu of locally-sourced, seasonal classic pub dishes, and a stunning range of Butcombe beers to sample, this characterful inn has everything you need for an intriguing visit to Avebury.

    A Brief History Of Avebury

    The stone circle at Avebury was constructed and adapted over many centuries, with it widely accepted that work began around 3000BC.

    The purpose of the Avebury monument (and many other neolithic sites such as Stonehenge) is often the subject of debate, though many experts agree that it is likely that they were created as areas for ceremonies or rituals.

    In the periods that followed, Avebury was targeted on multiple occasions. In the early 14th century, many of the stones were toppled by locals who believed that they were linked to the devil. By the 19th century, most of the stones had been removed – either due to the religious beliefs already stated, or had been broken down and used as building materials for nearby projects.

    The Avebury Stone Circles

    Henge

    Avebury is a henge monument, with a diameter measuring almost 350 metres. The henge is not perfectly circular and the height fluctuates, indicating that it was excavated simultaneously in different sectors.

    Outer Stone Circle

    The Outer Stone Circle has a diameter of 330 metres and originally consisted of approximately 30 standing stones. It is the largest stone circle in the world.

    Inner Stone Circles

    Two additional stone circles are situated towards the middle of the Avebury monument. Although considerably smaller than the Outer Stone Circle, they are both substantial. The Northern Inner Stone Circle has a diameter of 98 metres, while the Southern Inner Stone Circle boasts a diameter of 108 metres.

    Avenues

    There are two avenues at Avebury. The West Kennet Avenue, much of which still remains, begins at the southeastern entrance to the henge. The Beckhampton Avenue has only traces remaining, and begins at the henge’s western entrance.

    Silbury Hill

    Part of the Avebury World Heritage Site, Silbury Hill is a chalk mound that dates back to approximately 2500BC. It is estimated that more than 500,000kg of chalk and soil was used to create it, making it the largest artificial mound in Europe.

    Despite dominating the immediate landscape and attracting visitors in their droves, no-one knows why Silbury Hill was ever built.

    West Kennet Long Barrow

    West Kennet Long Barrow is a neolithic tomb which makes up part of the Avebury World Heritage Site.

    Although it is in excess of 5,000 years old, estimates suggest that it was only used as burial space for somewhere between 20-50 years.

    The remains of more than 30 human skeletons have been excavated from the site, with experts using cutting-edge technology to determine that they all died in a relatively short period of time, and may have even died at the same time.

    Avebury Manor House

    As the name suggests, Avebury Manor House is a manor house that dates from the 16th century and is Grade I listed.

    Situated less than 500 metres from Avebury Stone Circle, the manor house has been occupied by many famous names throughout the years.

    Having been restored by Alexander Keiller in the 1930s, the manor house faced destruction in the 1950s during a time when scores of manor houses throughout the country were being demolished and rebuilt by their owners.

    Fortunately, Avebury Manor House survived, and after changing hands several times in the subsequent decades, came under National Trust ownership in 1991.

    Avebury Manor Garden

    Adjoined to Avebury Manor House is the Avebury Manor Garden.

    The garden has been designed to appear as a series of “rooms”. In alphabetical order, they are: Church Garden, East Garden, Half Moon Garden, Kitchen Garden, Lions Walk, Monks Garden, Orchard, South Lawn and Topiary Garden.

    As the seasons change, so do the gardens, so if you can visit on more than one occasion throughout the year, you will be greeted by an ever-changing selection of annual plants.

    Avebury Village

    Although Avebury is undoubtedly well-known for its stone circles, the village itself is a sight to behold.

    In addition to Avebury Manor House, this delightful Wiltshire villages boasts two additional Grade I listed buildings.

    St James’ Church and The Great Barn are both fine architectural examples from their respective eras, while Beckhampton House, West Kennett House and the Waggon & Horses pub have received a host of accolades between them, including being described as “picturesque” by Historic England.

    Avebury On Screen

    The stone circles of Avebury and the village have appeared on TV on multiple occasions.

    During the 1970s, they were featured in Lucifer Rising, Children of the Stones and an episode of A Ghost Story for Christmas.

    The stone circles were also featured in a movie from 1998 called “Still Crazy”, while in 2002 both the stone circles and the local village pub appeared in an episode of “Most Haunted”.